The Wall Street Journal's Esther Fung looks at the growing trend of cities reducing the amount of parking required for new development, a way to simultaneously encourage mass transit use while helping to keep rents more affordable.

Cities such as New York, San Diego, Los Angeles, and San Francisco have led the way on this trend, while smaller cities, such as Nashville, are now mulling their own proposals. Meanwhile, tenants aren't always thrilled at the prospect of having fewer spaces. Many still insist on ample parking and worry that the lack of spaces will only make their neighborhood streets more congested.

Advocates for the removal of parking requirements say they drive up housing costs unnecessarily ...

Los Angeles in 1999 allowed developers to convert vacant commercial buildings downtown into housing and exempted them from parking requirements. The Adaptive Reuse Ordinance accounted for 75% of the 9,200 housing units built between 2000 and 2010, according to Michael Manville, assistant professor at UCLA’s Department of Urban Planning ...

“When cities remove parking requirements, developers build more housing with less parking, often in buildings and neighborhoods they had long ignored,” Mr. Manville said.

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