A line of taxis is shown in traffic as taxi drivers from the San Francisco Taxi Workers Association stage a rally at Uber headquarters in San Francisco, California June 22, 2015. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith - RTX1HNOG
A line of taxis is shown in traffic as taxi drivers from the San Francisco Taxi Workers Association stage a rally at Uber headquarters in San Francisco, California June 22, 2015. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith - RTX1HNOG

CityLab's Laura Bliss reports on a proposed "transportation demand management" (TDM) program being mulled in San Francisco that would require apartment developers to feature different ways of cutting down on traffic.

The program, developed by the city's planning department, its municipal transportation agency, and the county transportation authority, would require developers to earn points from a 26-item checklist that includes offering everything from a fleet of bikes to subsidized transit passes.

A few TDM measures, such as bike lockers, showers, and parking lot fees, were already sprinkled into the city planning code. But senior planner Wade Wietgrefe says that stuff generally only made it into projects on a voluntary basis, or as a mitigation following an environmental review. Now, developers will have to incorporate driving-reduction efforts before their projects get the green light from City Hall.

“They’re going to decide, ‘Do I want to provide 50 parking spaces if I need 20 points of TDM measures? Or do I want to provide 25 parking spaces because that'll get me closer?’ " says Wietgrefe. “So they get to weigh the costs and benefits of these features up front and integrate that into the project from the beginning.”

The measure was passed by the city planning commission last month and is now in front of the city's board of supervisors.

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